Those Who Have Never Been Slaves Shall Save The World.

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DEDICATED TO THOSE WHO FELL, and TO THOSE WHO CARRY ON.

Dacia, Country of “The Bravest and Most Just of the Thracians”.  The Place where Lived a Nation who believed in Immortality.  The Dacians were not just some primitives erased from history by the civilizing Roman Empire, and the Romanians are not descendants of Rome.  The Romans came to Dacia and disturbed the Gods, Burned the Forests, they took what they wanted – wives, children, land.  Watch Videos Below ~ Decebalus – “The Brave One”  ;  The Dacians ~ Romania’s Ancestors:  Ancient Dacia Documentary , Discover your Ancient Past, Connect with your Ancestors, and Awaken the Warrior Within.  It has been written in an Ancient Prophecy  ~ Those who have never been Slaves shall Save The World.

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Aceasta este reprezentarea grafica a luptei dintre Daci si Romani aflata pe o latura a Columnei lui Traian din Roma /Italia.

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UNESCO: Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity – 2008
URL: http://www.unesco.org/culture/ich/RL/…
Description: Performed in the Olt region of southern Romania, the Căluş ritual dance also formed part of the cultural heritage of the Vlachs of Bulgaria and Serbia. Although the oldest documented music used in this dance dates from the seventeenth century, the ritual probably derived from ancient purification and fertility rites using the symbol of the horse, which was worshipped as an embodiment of the sun. The rituals name derives from the Căluş, the wooden part of the horses bridle. The Căluş ritual features a series of games, skits, songs and dances, and was enacted by all-male Căluşari dancers to the accompaniment of two violins and an accordion. Young men used to be initiated into the ritual by a vataf (master) who had inherited the knowledge of descântece (magic charms) and the dance steps from his predecessor. Groups of Căluşari dancers, sporting colourful hats, embroidered shirts and trousers adorned with small jingling bells, perform complex dances, which combine stamping, clicking of the heels, leaping and swinging of the legs.
According to tradition, groups of dancing and chanting Căluşari, who were thought to be endowed with magical healing powers, went from house to house, promising good health and prosperity to villagers.
Until today, Căluşari meet to celebrate their dancing and musical prowess on White Sunday. Testifying the rich cultural diversity of Romania, the Căluş ritual is also widely promoted at folklore festivals, such as the Caracal festival in the region of Olt, turning it into a veritable national symbol.

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Decebalus or “The Brave One” (originally named Diurpaneus) was a king of Dacia (ruled the Dacians 87 106) and is famous for fighting three wars and negotiating two interregnums of peace without being eliminated against the Roman Empire under two emperors.  In the later short peace (end of 102-105) granted by Trajan, Decebalus continued to act as an independent king, rather than a conquered client and repeatedly annoyed or infuriated the Romans.

Consequently, the Legions under Trajan’s orders went on the offensive again in 105 AD and reduced the Dacian stronghold and capital Sarmizegetusa in 106 AD, finally running down Decebalus the same year, whereupon he committed suicide rather than being marched through Rome as a captured foreign leader.

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Awaken your Warrior Within, Save Your Country, Save The World

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The Dacians ~ Romania’s Ancestors: Ancient Dacia Documentary

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Pre-Dacian and Dacian Culture – Intro

Pre-Dacians and Dacians artifacts presented in chronological order
Artefactele pre-dacice si dacice sunt prezentate in ordine cronologica

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Pre-Dacian and Dacian Art Intro Part 2

Pre-Dacians and Dacians artifacts presented in chronological order (3 century BC – 1st c. AD)
Artefactele pre-dacice si dacice sunt prezentate in ordine cronologica (sec 3 i.e.n. – sec 1 e.n.)

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Pre-Dacian and Dacian Culture Intro Part 3

Artifacts and ancient vestiges that speak about Dacians’ culture. They are presented in chronological order

Artefactele pre-dacice si dacice sunt prezentate in ordine cronologica.

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Trajan’s Column | Dacian Wars Romanian History Dacians

Trajan’s Column is a Roman triumphal column in Rome which commemorates Roman emperor Trajan’s victory in the Dacian Wars. It is located in Trajan’s Forum, built near the Quirinal Hill, north of the Roman Forum. Completed in 113 CE, the freestanding column is most famous for its spiral bas relief, that artistically describes the epic wars between the Romans and Dacians (101–102 and 105–106). Its design has inspired numerous victory columns, both ancient and modern.

Inhabited by the ancient Dacians, today’s territory of Romania was conquered by the Roman Empire in 106, when Trajan’s army defeated the army of Dacia’s ruler Decebalus ( Dacian Wars). The Roman administration withdrew two centuries later, under the pressure of the Goths and Carpi.

The Romanian people was formed by the Romanization of the Roman Province of Dacia. The Romanians are descended from local populations: Dacians (Getae, Thracians) and Roman legionnaires and colonists. In the course of the two wars with the Roman legions, between 101 – 102 A.D. and. 105 – 106 A.D. respectively, the emperor Trajan succeeded after in defeating the Dacians and the greatest part of Dacia became a Roman province. The colonization with Roman or Romanized elements, the use of the Latin language and the assimilation of Roman civilization as well as the intense development of urban centres led to the Romanization of the autochthonous population. The intermarriage of Dacians with Roman colonists, formed the Daco-Roman population, which is part of the ethnogenesis process of the Romanian people. This process was concluded by the 10th century when the assimilation of the Slavs by the Daco-Romanians was completed.

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Sarmisegetuza

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 trãit cândva pe lume un viteaz popor

Legãnat de mare si de poala muntilor

Cu bãrbati ca bradu ‘nalt si fruntea de otel
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Si cu dragoste fierbinte de glia de sub El
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Refren:
Veniti cu Noi la Sarmisegetusa
Istoria ne cheamã la Cetatea Mamã
Veniti cu Noi sã bem din cupa nemuririi   
Zamolxe-i sus iar Dacii n-au apus !!!
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Multe-armate dusmãnoase vrut-au Dava Lor
Aducându-le urgia legiunilor
Au cerut pãmânt si apã din ogorul sfânt
Dar în luptã se fãcurã-o apã si-un pãmânt
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Refren:
Veniti cu Noi la Sarmisegetusa
Istoria ne cheamã la Cetatea Mamã
Veniti cu Noi sã bem din cupa nemuririi
Zamolxe-i sus iar Dacii n-au apus !!!
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Noi suntem urmasii Lor, urmasii Dacilor
Si aici vom fi de-acum în veacul vecilor
Cine ” De la  Râm ” s -a tras la Râm s-a dus ‘napoi
DACIA e România iar Dacii suntem Noi !!
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Refren:
Veniti cu Noi la Sarmisegetusa
Istoria ne cheamã la Cetatea Mamã
Veniti cu Noi sã bem din cupa nemuririi
Zamolxe-i sus iar Dacii n-au apus !!!
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Romanians ~ Arise ~ Those who have never been Slaves Shall Save The World.
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ROMANIA Learn the true history of my ancestors Geto-Dacian NOT the lies of the Vatican and other Nations!
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Dacians are the Civilization of all nations, but our true history is hidden by the Vatican for thousands of years!!! But doesn’t matter how much they try to hide the history ~ The true history of our ancestors is written in our souls* Dacians did not die, just wake up!!!!! We DACIANS ( Romanians) we will fight for the true history of our country ROMANIA!
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We are immortal! To know more detailed history of the Geto-Dacians fighting Watch this video please its titrate in English: This video is from historical sources!! Dacii (1967) The Dacians [multi-sub] part 1/2
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The Thracians, a Hidden History ~ (Tracii, Istorie Ascunsa)
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ZAMOLXES
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Legends and Mysteries of Romania (DACIA)
The Cave of Zamolxes, Ancient God of the Dacians
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The cave of the ancient God Zamolxes, the one worshiped by the people of Dacia, can be found and visited near the small town of Polovragi, Romania. The stories and mysteries of this place are a quite fascinating piece of history mixed with legends and mythological stories. Zamolxes was the All-Mighty God of the Dacians (also known in the Greek records as Getae people)
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Dacians were the ancient inhabitants of Dacia, located in the area in and around the Carpathian Mountains (Europe) and east of there to the Black Sea (this area includes the present-day county of Romania, as well as parts of Ukraine, Eastern Serbia, Northern Bulgaria, Slovakia, Hungary and Poland).
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After the Dacian Wars (AD 101-102, 105-106), the Romans occupied a part of the Dacian region and the people of Dacia were assimilated by the conquerors

Zamolxe The Arian, Son of Dumnezeu
Zamolxe of Dacia  (560-472 BCE)

Zamolxes is the All-Mighty Dacian God. Ancient Greek manuscripts depict him as a human, a prophet for his people. Herodot wrote about him as a Dacian man who, around the year 1400 BC, went traveling around the world learning astronomy and medicine. What it is, in fact, known is that this Zamolxes (after his death), was the most important God for the people of Dacia.

Zamolxe (Zamolxis or Zalmoxis) is best known among historians and students of religious studies as a Messianic God and civilizing hero of Dacians, the ancestors of the present days Romanian people. The reconstruction of a biographical account of Zamolxe, the Great God of Dacians, is a challenging task. Although the information from antiquity may rely on legends and myths, a biographical sketch could still be created. The result is that any biography is as legendary as the historical data employed.

Certain data are used as pillars of reference. From the historian Herodotus it is known, for instance, that Zamolxe lived in the island of Samos with Pythagoras, who most likely was born at about 580 BCE. We presume that Zamolxe was Pythagoras’ pupil. It may be a gap of 20 years between their birth dates; hence Zamolxe’s birth may be in the year 560 BCE. That makes him part of the Axial Age paradigmatic religious figures such as Buddha, Confucius, Lao-Tze, Mahavira, Pythagoras, and prophet Zechariah.

Zamolxe’s birthday is in a day of pagan winter celebration that is nowadays Christmas Day (the Romanian language still preserves the old name as CRĂCIUN), 25 December. His place of birth is in the area of Sarmisegetuza Regia, where for long existed an old sanctuary of the Dacian religion. Today in Romania, Sarmisegetuza still has remnants of the ancient cult temples.

The life of Pythagoras played a great role in that of Zamolxe. The Samian sage (Pythagoras was born in the Greek island of Samos) left Babylon in 535 BCE at the time of Persian invasion (by king Cyrus the Great) and stayed in Egypt until the Persians (king Cambyses II) conquered it in 525 BCE. The Persians took Pythagoras captive and brought him to Babylon. There he learned with Zarates, a Zoroastrian priest, until 520 BCE when he returned from the 20 years long spiritual journeys to Samos, his birthplace in Ionia (part of the ancient Greece).

Herodotus, the historian, remarks that Zamolxe was Pythagoras’ slave, but we interpret his statement, as that He was his pupil. There aren’t historical accounts of Pythagoras keeping slaves. The time period of Zamolxe’s study with Pythagoras was probably of two years until 518 BCE, the time when the sage decided to go to Croton in Magna Graecia, a Greek colony in the Southern Italy.
Another hypothesis is that Zamolxe reiterated to a lesser extent the spiritual journey of Pythagoras. In 518 BCE Zamolxe went to Babylon where he studied three years in the company of the same Zoroastrian priest Zarates. Then in 515 BCE He went to Jerusalem at the time of dedication of the second temple. In the same year Zamolxe went to Egypt for a further three years of deepening his learning.

Overall Zamolxe of Dacia was away from His home for eight years. During that time He acquired the great wisdom relevant to that ancient spiritual world. Returning home in about 512 BCE, Zamolxe started a series of religious and social reforms in order to civilise His people.

The apprenticeship with Pythagoras and other scholars shaped the backbone of His teachings. The beliefs that Zamolxe held were that:

1. Do oppose evil, honour the truth, look for justice and fill your soul with justice. By following those, the power of darkness diminishes.

2. Live in harmony with people, but if they are not peaceful enough they should be confronted for their minds are mastered by darkness.

3. Any person who did wrong deeds should restore them if possible; else that person is to be punished for own mistakes.

4. Respect everybody, but if someone is unworthy of it just ignore that person.

5. In all that you do, look at following the light of God.

6. Those with plenty of The Spirit of Wisdom go to the kingdom of God and are immortals.

7. Never offer sacrifices, based on killing and destruction of flowers and fruits, to God or gods; deities don’t need your material offerings. Your sacrifice has to be understood as giving up disorder in thinking, speaking and acting.

8. Learn from any nation what they have the best, thus the light of your people shines brighter.

9. Live simply, beautifully and justly.

10. Look at the flame of the sacred fire that is your link to God.

Zamolxe the Arian became Great Priest, then king, thus being able to be more efficient with His social reforms. As legislator and religious leader Zamolxe was known in the Greek world of His time and thereafter. He had knowledge of astronomy, medicine and mathematics; subjects learned primarily from Pythagoras.

The religion that Zamolxe instituted (better to say reformed), known as zamolxianism was a solar cult, a creed of soul salvation and of mysteries. It intermingled the secular with the religious, yet the society was not theocratic. Its timely evolution is yet to be discovered; today there are relevant traces of Zamolxe’s creed in the Romanian popular religion. The origin of certain traditions and customs point out to a native rather than Christian basis.

Studies in Romanian ethnography and folklore have uncovered trails of Zamolxian creed that survived and even evolved during centuries of Christian domination (mainly of the Romanian Orthodox Church).

Blood Sacrifice For Zamolxis

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Dacians used to bring sacrifices for their God. For example, at every four years they would sacrifice a man considered one of the brave. Four Dacians would hold four long spears. Others would throw the man up so that he would fall on the spears. Before the throwing, the brave man would receive all the messages that Dacians wanted to be sent to Zamolxes. If the man survived it was considered that the God didn’t accept the sacrifice and he was put to shame for the fact that he wasn’t worthy. If he died then the Dacians would celebrate that the God was pleased with the killing and received their messages.

The Cave of Zamolxes from Polovragi  

A cave in the small town of Polovragi is where the legend says that it was the home of the All-Mighty Dacian God. It is a mystical place where, as the legend says, the dacian priests performed many rituals. The name of Polovragi comes from the name of a plant “Polovraga”, which is extinct now, but, as to the local legends, in ancient times, it had the power to heal any disease or wound.

Zamolxes and the Legend of a “Shapeshifter”

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The old Dacian legends are depicting Zamolxes as a very powerful God that used to change his form from a young man to an old one. Some other legends are about this God changing into a wolf, as this animal was a sacred one for the people of Dacia. The cave is 7 million years old. Above the cave there have been discovered the ruins of an old Dacian fortress. It is said that the cave served as well to get from one side of the Carpathian Mountains, to the other side, where the capital of Dacia was (Sarmisegetuza). This part of the legend might as well be true because researches found 2000 years old shoe prints on the cave’s ground. The cave was discovered 100 years ago.

The Treasures and the Curse

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There are many stories of thousands of gold treasures buried in this cave. Tourists often say that in one of the chambers of this cave (where there is a stone that is considered by the locals to be Zamolxes’ throne) you can feel tingling in the hands.

Many locals have stories of horror about the cave. It is said that it is cursed and anyone who enters it and takes its treasures will soon die of a painful death. There are also legends of locals being terrified after their sheep herds had disappeared without a trace. Some say that around important religious holidays you can hear a chanting coming from the cave. It is said that it sounds like Romanian language but no one can actually understand the lyrics.

Where, How Much, How Do I Get There?

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The cave of Zamolxes can be found in the small town of Polovragi, Romania. There aren’t many tourists here, mainly because not many people know about it. The speleologist have managed to explore about 10 kilometers of the cave. It is not yet known for sure but the legends say that the cave is in fact a passage to the other side of the mountain.

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The cave can be found at about 244 kilometers from Bucharest, the capital of Romania (3 hours by car) . From Bucuresti you must go north-west to the city of Pitesti, on the highway. From Pitesti, you must go in the direction of the Ramnicu Valcea City. From Ramnicu Valcea you take the road to Horezu, a smaller city. And from Horezu you should easily find the town of Polovragi with your GPS, map or road signs.

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In Polovragi you can also visit a 17th century monastery, built in a byzantine style. From here you can go to the cave of Zamolxes, walking on the side of the Oltet river and you can admire the magnificent landscape.

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Of the 10 kilometers explored of the cave, tourist have access to only 900 meters. There is a humid and hot atmosphere in the cave (about 9 degrees Celsius and 90% humidity). The entrance fee is rather low, under 2 euros. The visiting hours are from Friday to Sunday (weekend), from 11.00 AM to 5.00 PM.

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Misterul Sfinxului din Carpati Partea I

SFINXUL
Cu ochii visului eu l-am văzut
pe Sfinxul ce domeneşte neantul
Avea sub labe câte-un univers
pe care ghearele le frământau,
la gât podoabă galaxii strălucitoare
vibrând un requiem fără asemănare.
Părea dormind şi respira nori de nuclei
în frigul fără nume care-i slăvea puterea,
blana de foc ardea mistere sulfuroase,
lent coada-i se mişca stârnind apocalipse.
Pe cap, ca o coroană, plutea timpul rotind
şi în urechi abisul se-nghesuia timid.
Apoi a deschis ochii încet, încet şi trist
privind prin găuri negre în infinitul său
era saşiu stăpânul şi mort cu suflet viu.

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Misterul Sfinxului din Carpati Partea II ULTIMA

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Posted on April 10, 2014, in Legends. Bookmark the permalink. 4 Comments.

  1. Alex Dacian Wolf

    Aveti un website foarte informativ si interesant. si sint de acord, teara noastra este Dacic, noi nu sintem urmasi de Roma. personal eu sint mindru de mostenirea si istoria noastra adevarata. pacat ca povestea oficiala istorica este o minciuna care este crezuta, desi este destrul evidenta stientifica, istorica si culturala care arata clar ca noi sintem Daci. Multumesc pentru informatia si va dor succes in viitor. sa continuati sa aduceti adevarul la lumina ca lumea sa stie cine sintem noi. sa traiasca Dacia libera, acum si pentru totdeauna !

  2. Sa traiasca Dacia libera, acum si pentru totdeauna !

  3. Niciodată nu e prea târziu să afli cine te-a născut .Clipa e mirifică .

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